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Homework Peter Cameron Themes For Parties

Schoolchildren everywhere complain about having to do homework, especially over the holidays. 

But one seven-year-old boy decided he needed to tell his teacher exactly how he felt about his spelling assignment. 

Angus, who is believed to live in Bangkok with his mother Lisa, found ways to use all ten of his spelling words in sentences that expressed his dislike for homework.

Creative: Seven-year-old Angus demonstrated out-of-the-box thinking when it came to answering his homework assignment, using his spelling words in sentences criticising the task

Making a point: Angus ended the answer sheet by writing: 'Save trees, less homework'

The creative responses included: 'Little kids hate homework' and 'Who said homework is fun?' Determined to get his point across, Angus ended the answers by scrawling the statement: 'Save trees, less homework' in large letters. 

Mother Lisa was tickled by her son's response and shared an image of his answer sheet on Twitter with the caption: 'Reminded my kid he needed to do his homework he put off for 3 wks during break. This is his finished work. Only 7 and already #TrollingHisTeacher.'

The tweet has been 'liked' and retweeted thousands of times, with supporters praising Angus' creativity. 

Worldwide support: Mother Lisa shared the responses to the delight of Twitter users

One posted: 'Your kid is a freaking genius. I'd give him an A... Brilliant work.' Another added: 'This is too funny! I am a teacher and would chuckle while grading!'

Some Twitter users questioned whether Angus was being 'disrespectful' with his answers but mother Lisa stepped in to defend her child, saying he 'adores' his teacher. 

'He adores his teacher, as do I! And luckily she has a great sense of humor. A great teacher is a gift, so we’ve been blessed!,' she tweeted. 

Praise: Twitter users congratulated Angus on his engaged approach to the homework

Speaking to indy100, Lisa said: 'There’s not a whole lot to the story other than my son, Angus, waited until the last minute of his three-week break to do his homework and went into doing it very disgruntled and put off.

'But as he started to do it and I was cleaning around the house I heard him giggling more and more until he was in a fit of full-blown laughter before declaring loudly, "DONE!"' 

She later shared a photo of Angus looking 'pleased with himself' moments after finishing the homework.  

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Principal Catherine Hutley has banned homework so staff can spend more time planning lessons

A school has stopped giving homework to pupils because the headmistress says teachers don't have enough time to mark and prepare lessons. 

Catherine Hutley, principal at Philip Morant School and College, in Colchester, Essex, claims scrapping after-school work will allow staff to use the time to plan better lessons.

Schools which have previously scrapped homework have made the move to reduce mental health problems among pupils. Some have extended school hours instead. 

Ms Hutley said she accepted the move was controversial but said she was 'genuinely excited' about the innovative approach and is convinced students - who are aged between 11 and 18 - will benefit.

She said: 'The job of a teacher is impossible. There are not enough hours in the day for a teacher to teach, set homework, mark homework, and plan their lessons.

'It is a move away from a more traditional approach but we would not do anything which would hinder the progress of our children.

'We have the most dedicated and committed staff you could possibly ask for. They are working every hour God sends but planning lessons can fall by the wayside.

'We want it to be the number one priority so teachers can plan for students' individual needs and keep on top of their progress on a daily basis.'

Ms Hutley said out-of-school-hours learning will still be encouraged through the school's website with prizes offered to the most dedicated students.

She said homework was too often made up of finishing curriculum work which had not been completed in class.

She also said it would stop children who do not complete their homework from falling behind. 

The new rule has been introduced at Philip Morant School and College, in Colchester, Essex

Ms Hutley said she accepted the move was controversial but said she was 'genuinely excited' about the innovative approach and is convinced students will benefit

Ms Hutley said the move away from traditional homework had been discussed for a year.

She added: 'We are aware opinions on this issue are polarised with many parents and carers delighted by the change but others concerned by what the move will mean for their child.

'We have carefully analysed the performance and progress of our students and the impact homework has had on this.

'We know homework is not working for the majority of our students.

'This new approach allows us to more carefully track and monitor students both academically but also against skills critical for their lives ahead.'

The school, which has 1,650 students and was rated 'good' in its last Ofsted report, has already got rid of academic banding and the use of mobile phones at school.

Ms Hutley added: 'If, for any reason, we start to see this new approach to homework is having a negative impact on students' progress, we will do something about it.

'But I do not believe that will happen.' 

Last year the independent boarding school Cheltenham Ladies' College announced plans to ditch homework in response to an 'epidemic' of mental health problems.

In 2013 Jane Austen College, in Norwich, said pupils would be expected to complete all their work during timetabled hours, and extended the school day to 5pm.

Ms Hutley

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