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Early American Writings Discussion 1.07 Assignment Discovery

Early American Writings – 1.07 Discussions Piety: 1. What is the value and why was it important to them? Piety is a deep respect for God and the demonstration of ones faith through religious. Even before the Pilgrims traveled to the new world they carried it along with them and while there Piety got even stronger and powerful to them. Piety was important to the Pilgrims because their believes was that laziness is not Gods doing and all of the members depended on each other one person laziness could lead to serious hardship for all, they also believed that worshipping God they will be protected from all things. 2. How do the writers incorporate this value into their works? The writers incorporate this value into their works, In the text Model of Christian Charity, the author encourages settlers to always be at worship every Sunday morning for whom so every that don’t come will be punished, through this you can understand that this was one of their important value. The value became more important over time

British cartoon depicting Tom Paine as the 'staymaker of the revolution'.

Detailed Schedule

· This schedule is subject to adjustments and alterations, which will be announced both in class and online.
· Readings are due for online discussion and at the class meeting following the assignment date specified.
· Bold numbers in square brackets refer to class session number.

[For archiving, some selections have been deleted from the Literature Jukebox presentations that appear below.]


Wednesday, January 22 [1]

Course introduction
Assignment: Discovering the Discovered -- Read Native American Oral Narrative (HA 21-64); Christopher Columbus, selections from Journal of the First Voyage and Narrative of the Third Voyage (HA 107-119).
Online discussion and reading responses to be posted before Friday.

Friday, January 24 [2]

Discussion sections
Assignment: Europe, Arizona and New Mexico – Read Alvar Nunez Cabeza de Vaca (HA 119-130); Gaspar Pérez de Villagrá, selections from The History of New Mexico (HA 146-164); Don Antonio de Otermín, ‘Letter on the Pueblo Revolt’ (HA 182-190); Hopi, ‘The Coming of the Spanish and the Pueblo Revolt’ (HA 190-194); Don Diego de Vargas, from Letter on the Reconquest of New Mexico, 1692 (HA 194-200).

Monday, January 27 [3]

Assignment: French and English Encounter and Settlement Narratives – Read Samuel de Champlain, from The Voyages of Samuel de Champlain (HA 205-211); from The Jesuit Relations, ‘The Relation of 1647’ (HA 213-221); Thomas Harriot, A Briefe and True Report of the New Found Land of Virginia (HA 224-233); Edward Maria Wingfield, from A Discourse of Virginia (HA 234-242); John Smith, The Generall Historie of Virginia, New-England, and the Summer Isles (HA 242-256); Nathaniel Bacon, Nathaniel Bacon Esq’r his Manifesto Concerning the Present Troubles in Virginia (HA 260-267); James Revel, ‘The Poor, Unhappy Transported Felon’ (HA 267-275).

Wednesday, January 29 [4]

Assignment: Atlantic Slavery and Social Terror – Read Linebaugh and Rediker, The Many-Headed Hydra (1-142, chaps. 1-4).
Online discussion and reading responses to be posted before Friday.

Friday, January 31 [5]

Discussion sections
Assignment: The Puritan Elders – Read John Winthrop, from A Modell of Christian Charity and The Journal of John Winthrop (HA 294-311); William Bradford, Of Plymouth Plantation (HA 311-334); Thomas Shepard, Autobiography (HA 355-382).

Monday, February 3 [6] [Unrestricted Withdrawal Deadline, February 4]

Assignment: Early New England Religious Culture – Read Anne Bradstreet (HA 382-401); Michael Wigglesworth, from The Diary of Michael Wigglesworth and ‘A Song of Emptiness’ (HA 402-410); Cotton Mather, from The Wonders of the Invisible World and Magnalia Christi Americana (HA 495-511).

Wednesday, February 5 [7] [Course website closes]

Assignment: Frontier Conflict and Captivity Narratives – Read Mary White Rowlandson, from A Narrative of the Captivity and Restauration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson (HA 425-456); Cotton Mather, Decennium Luctuosum: An History of Remarkable Occurences in the Long [Indian] War (HA 512-514); John Williams, from The Redeemed Captive Returning to Zion (HA 521-531).
Online discussion and reading responses to be posted before Friday.
Paper #1 – Literature of Contact paper -- assigned.

Friday, February 7 [8]

Discussion sections
Assignment: Religious Awakenings: Two Versions – Read Jonathan Edwards, from A Faithful Narrative of the Surprising Work of God, ‘Personal Narrative’, and ‘Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God’ (HA 620-622, 626-650) [Literature Jukebox - 'Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God,' Jonathan Edwards -- Jim Prendergast]; John Woolman, from The Journal of John Woolman and Some Considerations on the Keeping of Negroes (HA 664-683).

Monday, February 10 [9]

Assignment: Transatlantic Conspiracies and the Scent of Revolution – Read Linebaugh and Rediker, The Many-Headed Hydra (143-247, chaps. 5-8)

Wednesday, February 12 [10]

Assignment: Benjamin Franklin and ‘Seizing the Scepter of Tyrants’ – Read Franklin, ‘The Way of Wealth,’ ‘A Witch Trial at Mount Holly,’ ‘The Speech of Polly Baker,’ ‘Remarks Concerning the Savages of North America,’ ‘On the Slave Trade,’ ‘Speech in the Convention,’ and from The Autobiography (HA 782-784, 785-796, 798-801, 804-867)
Online discussion and reading responses to be posted before Friday.

Friday, February 14 [11]

Assignment: Transatlantic Revolutions – Read Thomas Paine, from Common Sense [Literature Jukebox - 'Common Sense,' Thomas Paine - Jim Prendergast], The American Crisis, The Age of Reason (HA 934-954); Touissant L’Ouverture, ‘Proclamations and Letters’ (HA 1023-1029); Wendell Phillips, from Toussaint L’Ouverture (HA 1996 – 2007); Linebaugh and Rediker, The Many-Headed Hydra (287-353, chap. 9 and Conclusion).
Discussion sections
Paper #1 due in section.

Monday, February 17 [12]

Assignment: Transatlantic Slavery – Read Olaudah Equiano, from The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa (HA 1116-1149)

Wednesday, February 19 [13]

Assignment: Early American Republicanism – Read Thomas Jefferson, ‘A Declaration by the Representatives of the United States of America, in General Congress Assembled’; from Notes on the State of Virginia and ‘Letters’ (HA 975 – 1007); The Federalist no. 6, The Federalist no. 10, ‘An Anti-Federalist Paper’ (HA 1008 – 1022).
Online discussion and reading responses to be posted before Friday.

Friday, February 21 [14]

Assignment: Early American Disenfranchisement – Read Samson Occum, A Short Narrative of My Life and A Sermon Preached by Samson Occum (HA 1078 – 1100); Prince Hall, ‘To the Honorable Council & House of Representatives of the State of Massachusetts’ and ‘A Charge, Delivered to the African Lodge’ (HA 1106 – 1115); Judith Sargent Murray, ‘On the Equality of the Sexes’ (HA 1157 – 1163).
Discussion sections

Monday, February 24 [15]


Assignment: Two Early American Poets – Read Phillip Freneau, ‘The Power of Fancy,’ ‘A Political Litany,’ ‘To Sir Toby,’ ‘The Wild Honey Suckle,’ from ‘The Country Printer,’ ‘On the Universality and Other Attributes of the God of Nature,’ ‘On Observing a Large Red-Streak Apple,’ ‘The Indian Burying Ground,’ ‘On the Causes of Political Degeneracy’ (HA 1175 – 1191); Phillis Wheatley, ‘To Mæcenas,’ ‘Letter to the Right Hon’ble The Earl of Dartmouth,’ ‘To the Right Honourable William, Earl of Dartmouth,’ ‘Letter to the Rt. Hon’ble the Countess of Huntingdon,’ ‘On the Death of the Rev. Mr. George Whitefield 1770,’ ‘On the Death of Dr. Samuel Marshall 1771,’ ‘On Being Brought from Africa to America,’ ‘A Farewell to America,’ ‘To the University of Cambridge, in New England,’ ‘To His Excellency General Washington,’ ‘Liberty and Peace,’ ‘Letter to Samson Occum’ (HA 1205 – 1221)

Wednesday, February 26 [16]

Assignment: Early American Drama – Read Royall Tyler, ‘The Contrast: A Comedy in Five Acts’ (HA 1257 – 1300)
Online discussion and reading responses to be posted before Friday.

Friday, February 28 [17]

Assignment: Eighteenth-Century Sex Scandals and Literary Bestsellers – Read Hannah Webster Foster, from The Coquette; or, the History of Eliza Wharton (HA 1306 – 1325)
Discussion sections

Monday, March 3 [18]

Assignment: Indians, Whites and Narrative Mirrors – Read William Apess, An Indian’s Looking-Glass for the White Man (HA 1397 – 1403); Elias Boudinot, ‘An Address to the Whites’ (HA 1409 – 1418); Seattle, ‘Speech of Chief Seattle’ (HA 1418 – 1422); George Copway, from The Life of Kah-ge-ga-gah-bowh (HA 1422 – 1437); Washington Irving, from A History of New York [chap. 5] (HA 2071 – 2081); Lydia Sigourney, ‘The Indian’s Welcome to the Pilgrim Fathers’ and ‘Indian Names’ (HA 1507 – 1509)

Wednesday, March 5 [19]

Assignment: Early American Regionalism and the Populist Voice – Read Washington Irving, ‘Rip Van Winkle’ and ‘The Legend of Sleepy Hollow’ (HA 2081 – 2112); Davy Crockett, from The Crockett Almanacs (HA 2052 – 2055); Mike Fink, from The Crockett Almanacs and ‘The Death of Mike Fink’ (HA 2056 – 2060) [Literature Jukebox - 'Mike Fink's Brag' - Jenny Allen] [Literature Jukebox - 'Sal Fink, the Mississippi Screamer, How She Cooked Injuns' - Biliana Iacsin]; Augustus Longstreet, ‘The Horse Swap’ (HA 2061 – 2065).
Online discussion and reading responses to be posted before Friday.

Friday, March 7 [20]

Assignment: Hawthorne and Civil Sin (1) – Read Nathaniel Hawthorne, ‘My Kinsman, Major Molineux,’ ‘Young Goodman Brown,’ and ‘The Minister’s Black Veil’ (HA 2170 – 2203); Herman Melville, “Hawthorne and His Mosses” (HA 2714 – 2726).
Discussion sections
Midterm course and IT evaluation
Take-home midterm examination

Monday, March 10 [21]

Assignment: Hawthorne and Civil Sin (2) -- Read Nathaniel Hawthorne, ‘The Birthmark’ and ‘Rappaccini’s Daughter’ (HA 2204 – 2234)

Wednesday, March 12 [22]

Assignment: Hawthorne and Civil Sin (3) – Read Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter (HA 2235 – 2372) and Preface to The House of the Seven Gables (HA 2372 – 2373) [note that this assignment is due on Monday, March 24]

Friday, March 14
Spring Break

Monday, March 24 [23]

Assignment: Online discussion of The Scarlet Letter

Wednesday, March 26 [24]

Assignment: Online discussion of The Scarlet Letter

Friday, March 28 [25]

Assignment: Poe’s Mysteries (1) -- Read Edgar Allan Poe (HA 2387 – 2389), ‘The Fall of the House of Usher,’ ‘The Tell-Tale Heart,’ and ‘The Black Cat’ (HA 2400 – 2413, 2420 - 2429)

Monday, March 31 [26]

Assignment: Poe’s Mysteries (2) -- Read Edgar Allan Poe, ‘The Purloined Letter’ and ‘The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar’ (HA 2430 – 2449)

Wednesday, April 2 [27]

Assignment: Poe’s Mysteries (3) – Read Edgar Allan Poe, ‘The Raven,’ ‘The Philosophy of Composition,’ ‘The City in the Sea,’ ‘The Sleeper,’ [Literature Jukebox - 'The Sleeper' - Elizabeth Larntz]‘Ulalume,’ and ‘Annabel Lee’ (HA 2467 – 2470, 2449 – 2457, 2461 – 2464, 2470 – 2474)
Online discussion and reading responses to be posted before Friday.

Friday, April 4 [28]

Assignment: The New England School (1) – Read John Greenleaf Whittier, ‘The Hunters of Men,’ ‘The Farewell,’ Massachusetts to Virginia,’ ‘At Port Royal’ (HA 1613 – 1625); Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, ‘A Psalm of Life,’ ‘The Warning,’ ‘The Jewish Cemetery at Newport,’ and ‘Aftermath’ (HA 2822 – 2827).

Monday, April 7 [29]

Assignment: The New England School (2) – Read Ralph Waldo Emerson, ‘Nature’, ‘The American Scholar,’ and ‘The Poet’ (HA 1512 – 1555, 1572 – 1587).

Wednesday, April 9 [30]

Assignment: The New England School (3) – Read Ralph Waldo Emerson, ‘Self-Reliance’ (HA 1555 – 1572); Henry David Thoreau, Resistance to Civil Government (HA 1669 – 1686).
Online discussion and reading responses to be posted before Friday.

Friday, April 11 [31]

Assignment: Literature and ‘The Woman Question’ – Read Sarah Moore Grimké, from Letters on the Equality of the Sexes, and on the Condition of Woman; Angelina Grimké, ‘Letters to Catherine Beecher’; Sojourner Truth, ‘Remniscences by Frances D. Gage,’ Speech at the New York City Convention,’ ‘Address to the First Annual Meeting of the American Equal Rights Association’ (HA 2012 – 29); Fanny Fern, ‘The Working Girls of New York’ (HA 2030 – 2031, 2037 – 2038); Elizabeth Cady Stanton, from Eighty Years and More: Reminiscences, and Declaration of Sentiments (HA 2038 – 2044)

Further Reading: SeeStanton and Anthony Papers Online

Monday, April 14 [32]

Assignment: Literature and the Slavery Question (1) – Read David Walker, from Appeal to the Coloured Citizens of the World; William Lloyd Garrison, ‘Editorial’; Lydia Maria Child, from Appeal in Favor of that Class of Americans Called Africans and ‘Letters’; Angelina Grimké, from Appeal to the Christian Women of the South (HA 1774 – 1814); George Fitzhugh, from Southern Thought (HA 1908 – 1918).

Wednesday, April 16 [33]

Assignment: Literature and the Slavery Question (2) – Read Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (HA 1814 – 1880) and ‘What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?’ (HA 1881 – 1899). [Literature Jukebox - 'What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?' Frederick Douglass - Tyle Lahn]
Online discussion and reading responses to be posted before Friday.

Friday, April 18 [34]

Assignment: Literature and the Slavery Question (3) – Continue with Douglass.

Monday, April 21 [35]

Assignment: Literature and the Slavery Question (4) – Read Herman Melville, Benito Cereno (HA 2550 – 2553, 2598 – 2655).
Paper #2 – Literature of Slavery paper – assigned.

Wednesday, April 23 [36]

Assignment: Literature and the Slavery Question (5) – Continue with Melville.
Online discussion and reading responses to be posted before Friday.

Friday, April 25 [37]

Assignment: Melville and the Atlantic Hydrarchy – Read Herman Melville, Billy Budd, Sailor (HA 2656 – 2714).

Monday, April 28 [38]

Assignment: Whitman, Dickinson and Visions of a New Self (1) – Read Walt Whitman, 'Song of Myself,' 'When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloomed,' 'Respondez,' 'Democratic Vistas.' (HA 2863 - 2914, 2941 - 2948, 2957 - 2959, 2960 - 2969)

Wednesday, April 30 [39]

Assignment: Whitman, Dickinson and Visions of a New Self (2)
Emily Dickinson, poems (J numbers) 249, 258, 303, 324, 341, 448, 465, 501, 520, 569, 657, 670, 712, 754, 1737. (HA 2969 - 3008, various pages) [Literature Jukebox - 'Wild Nights - Wild Nights!' - Jenny Allen]['I Can Wade Grief' - Jenny Allen]
Online discussion and reading responses to be posted before Friday.

Friday, May 2 [40]

Assignment: Whitman, Dickinson and Visions of a New Self (3)
Paper #3 due in section.

Monday, May 5 FINAL CLASS [41]

Review class

Final Exam --- Tuesday, May 13, 7:40-9:30am. Bring blue books.

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